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Is calling someone a profanity at work harassment or office banter?

Harassment is a form of unlawful discrimination and can include behaviour that individuals find offensive even if it’s not directed at them, and even if they do not have the relevant protected characteristics themselves. It is important for an employer to be able to recognise harassment in the workplace to reduce the risk of an employee lodging an employment tribunal claim against them. Therefore it is in every employer’s interest to promote a safe, healthy and fair environment in which people can work in.

Mass Redundancies and Protective Awards

When a firm makes more than 20 or 100 people redundant such as through closing down a factory site, very special rules apply as to an employer’s obligations to its workforce. Failure on the Employer’s part such as when closures occur out of the blue and almost overnight can lead to employees being able to make a claim even if the company has gone into administration or liquidation and the company no longer exists. Most typically the claim is for what is known as a Protective Award.

When and how should you suspend an employee?

The decision of whether or not to suspend an employee suspected of misconduct can be a difficult one for many employers. If an employer suspects an employee of serious misconduct, suspension may be an appropriate step to take but only in circumstances where the employee’s presence at work would either (a) jeopardise the fairness of the ensuing investigation or (b) where their presence could pose a potential threat to the business or other employees.

Beat the January Blues

Anxiety, depression and stress are now the leading cause of sickness absence in the UK and an estimated 70 million working days are lost every year because of mental health. This makes mental wellbeing a central concern for all workers and their employers.

Linder Myers – Legal 500 Directory

Linder Myers is proud to feature in the Legal 500 legal directory. Each year the Legal 500 directory undertake an independent, full and comprehensive analysis of law firms across the United Kingdom in order to assess the best law firms across the country and by region.

Sleep-in workers – is a person working simply by being present?

A hot topic within the employment sector is the question of whether ‘sleeping time’ should be classed as ‘working time’ for the purpose of National Minimum Wage Regulations (NMWR).

The aim of this deliberation is to determine whether employees should be paid for hours spent sleeping whilst technically being ‘at work’. Many would declare that their dream job would be getting paid to sleep, but is there a valid argument to support this?

The apprenticeship levy explained

Under the Equality Act 2010, it is common practice for an employer to be held vicariously liable for discriminatory acts that their employees commit during ‘the course of employment’. Imposing strict liability on employers encourages them to maintain standards of “good practice” by their employees.

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